Tag Archives: David Powlison

Powerful Quotes from David Powlison’s “How Does Sanctification work?”

18 Jun

Last week I finished reading David Powlison’s new book¬†How Does Sanctification Work?¬†It is a small volume, but well worth reading. Powlison is the executive director of the Christian Counseling and Educational Foundation (CCEF). This book is powerful and helpful to all who want to grow in Christ. Here are a few quotes I found helpful . . .

“Jesus’s first three words (from the cross) reach with mercy to others. His last four words reach out in need to His Father. Why is this significant? Jesus’s actual first-person experience expresses the fundamental extroversions of candid faith and personalized love. We can easily imagine how being tortured to death and facing imminent asphyxiation would pull any one of us into a whirlpool of self-absorption in pain and vulnerability. A person in such agony reacts in typical ways: despair, impotent rage, self-pity, terror, and an overwhelming urge to numb or escape pain. But amid intense suffering, Jesus cries out to the Father and cares for the people around Him. We watch and hear how honestly He lives the Psalms. We witness how specifically He lives out the commandments to love His God and His neighbors. We stand in awe.” (p. 38)

“Ministry electrifies when it connects something to someone rather than trying to say everything to no one in particular.” (p. 42)

“There are good reasons why not every Christian is impressed with the one truth that may have revolutionized your life. That one partial truth may have really helped you, and it may be drawing a particular kind of person to your ministry. But when one truth morphs into The Truth — the whole truth — it becomes an ax to grind. It promises a panacea, a “cure all.” As this happens, it slides in the direction of a magic formula, a “secret” to be discovered, not the plain, simple wisdom of God. A word that helps some kinds of people can prove unhelpful — even misleading and destructive — to people who need one of the other kinds of help that God gives. Preachers and counselors, beware!” (p. 42)

I could go on with more great quotes, but that gives you a flavor of some of the wisdom Powlison shares in the book. I benefited greatly from the fruit of Powlison’s life and ministry shared in this book.

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